CategoryProjects

Call for participants

We are looking for storytellers to explore how journalism could be designed for physical interaction. As computers move out of desktops and into the built environment, there is an opportunity to change the shape of news.

The Exploring Physical Journalism project aims to understand the possibilities.

Over the next few months we will be speaking with journalists, news designers and developers about how they approach storytelling and will invite them to speculate on how to do the same thing in locations using technologies such as lights, sensors, objects and projections, among other things.

We are looking for people who would like to be involved in this research.

If you are a journalist, news designer, producer or someone who likes to push the boundaries of non-fiction storytelling, we’d love to talk to you.

Email Skye Doherty: Send Mail


Can journalism get physical?

As computation moves out of desktops and into the built environment and everyday objects, there is an opportunity to reimagine the ways in which journalism can be reshaped.

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What would the plants say?

What would the plants say? Amid global warming and environmental stress, what can plants tell us about our environment that other forms of communication can not?

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Hacking for real-world change

In science fiction, technologies mediating human-computer interaction is a common topic allowing us to envisage how new emerging devices and systems may continue to redefine even further the interrelationships between humans and the world outside.

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Sci-fi and the public sphere

The idea that people in a society can freely come together to discuss issues and take action is often challenged in science fiction, where media technologies suppress the public sphere.

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Winter research 2018

What can science fiction tell us about the future of journalism? How might we think about physical news?

As part of two winter research projects we’ll be taking inspiration from sci-fi novels and physical computing to gather inspiration for imagining journalism of the future. Over six weeks, well be looking at how writers have imagined how news and information might be communicated in the future and investigating the possibilities for physical news experiences. The aim is to create some provocation material for a design workshop later in the year.

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The JxD process

At the University of Queensland we’ve been teaching interaction design to journalism students for some time and noticed that many struggled with the uncertainty that surrounds designing. Design is about imagining possibilities and, unlike writing a news story, you often don’t know where the process will lead.

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Using design workbooks

Design workbooks or journals are valuable tools in generating ideas and documenting design work. They are useful throughout the Journalism Design process but particularly in the early stages of Discover and Imagine.

Design workbooks are collections of research, materials, ideas and proposals, and play an important role in helping to understand the nature of a problem and the possibilities for solving it.

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Developing the process via workshop

The JxD process is almost completed and will be available on this site very soon along with some additional resources.  Representing the process and all of it’s ‘layers’ (we think that’s a good way to describe this) has been challenging.  This final representation has been the result of a few steps, perhaps the most important being a design workshop around the JxD process. We originally designed a framework – a structure for thinking about Journalism Design, but as a result of the workshop, we realised we needed a process instead. Here’s a quick summary of how that workshop ran and what it produced.

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Research for design

Data from student projects, reflective essays and interviews in 2016.

The contextual phase of our research aimed to understand how the 2016 cohort of Journalism Design students imagined the future of journalism. We were interested in how they used design methods and how and when they considered journalistic values. To do this, we studied the design projects and reflective essays created by students as part of course assessment and we interviewed some about their experience. A few themes emerged from the data: that journalistic values played an important role in the design process; that journalism needed to focus more strongly on audiences and users; and that new ideas would come from thinking big.

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